Holi trek to Haji Ka Malang and Malang Gad

Make love not war.

The hill was abode of thirteenth century Sufi Saint named Haji Abdur Rehman Shah Malang, popularly known as ‘Haji Malang Baba’.

Saint who came to India from Yemen preached and practiced simplicity, harmony and brotherhood amount people belonging to different communities, religions and castes. A place equally respected by people from all communities and religion.

Let’s trek and get blessed.

Mile Stones on treks:

Haji Wadi (Base Village)
The Mazaar of Haji Bhaktawar Shah Baba-First Salami (reached after few huffs and puffs)
The Dargah of Haji Sultan Shah Baba – Second Salami

The mazaars of the Baba and Ma Fatima lie side by side in the shrine. (Approximately it takes two hours to reach here)

From the Dargah, a further trek of 45 minutes to on hour, takes the pilgrims to the tombs of ‘Panch Peer’, the disciples of Baba who came with him. Along this stretch, one can also visit the place known as ‘Ghodya ki taap’.

After the pilgrimage to the shrine of Haji Malang Baba, those with adventurous spirit and stamina can venture to climb the mountain further to the top that will take them to the citadel (Balekilla).

From the top of the mountain one can see Chanderi, Matheran range to the south, Kalyan city, Mahuli to the north and Mumbai to the west.

Event Schedule:

6:00 am Start from Andheri, Mumbai.
Pickup points at Bandra, Sion, Chembur and Vashi.

Camp Fee: Rs.850/- (Rs.100 discount for members)

Includes transport (Private); Breakfast; Evening Tea / Snacks
Carry your lunch and water (option available at Local Dhaba too).

More Information about Haji Malang:

The gigantic mountain on the edge of eastern horizon can be viewed right from Badlapur to Thane as one commutes by the Central local trains.
Haji Malang Gad, which had been the abode of a thirteenth century Sufi saint named Haji Abdur Rehman Shah Malang, popularly known as ‘Haji Malang Baba’ whose shrine (dargah) halfway up the mountain had been attracting pilgrims belonging to different castes, religions and regions.

According to legend, Haji Abdur Rehman Shah was a thirteenth century mystic who came to this country from Yemen in the Middle East and settled down on this mountain to preach simplicity, harmony and brotherhood among people belonging to different communities and castes.
Tradition mentions that on reaching the village at the foot of the mountain, Haji Malang Baba felt very thirsty and asked for water from a house belonging to a Brahman. The Brahman, realizing that the Baba and his followers are tired, arranged for a place to rest and offered them milk instead of water. This holy act of the Brahman was duly appreciated by Baba and he blessed him. According to another legend, the local ruler, King Nall, is said to have offered his daughter to the Baba as a disciple. The mazaars of the Baba and Ma Fatima lie side by side in the shrine.

The Narrow and Steep Path Leading to the Dargah of Haji Bhaktawar Baba
Haji Malang Baba’s dargah, in true syncretic tradition (where Hindus and Muslims pray together), was one of the few shrines where a Hindu ‘vahivatdar’ (traditional priest from the Hindu Karandekar family) and a Muslim ‘mutavalli’ (claiming to be distant kin of the Baba), have both been officiating at religious rituals. The way to the dargah is lined by temples dedicated to Shiva and Ganesh.

How to reach there?

Reach Kalyan by train, board State Transport bus at around 8.30. A 15 Km bus ride from Kalyan (30 minutes) would take you to Haji Malang Wadi, share richshaws are also available. You have to trek from here onwards.

From the base of the mountain till the shrine of Haji Malang Baba takes around two hours. The first half of the journey is quite difficult with steep climbing steps and sharp turnings.

Trek route from base till Haji Dargah is lined up with several small shops / dhabas so don’t worry about caring food. You have plenty of options for food and refreshments along the way.

After negotiating the steep climb around halfway through, the pilgrims reach the dargah of Haji Bhaktawar Shah Baba, one of the companions of Haji Malang Baba. The offering at this dargah is known as the ‘First Salami’.
After trekking a little higher, the pilgrims find the remaining journey easier as one walks through inclined slop with stretches of narrow muddy road and steps at intervals.

The pilgrims are usually confronted by intimidating groups of monkeys who demand their share of offerings in the form of pulses like ‘chana’ or other eatables.

A few minutes before the main shrine, the pilgrims are expected to visit the dargah of Haji Sultan Shah Baba, another companion of Haji Malang Baba. The offerings at this dargah are known as “Second Salami”.

On the way to the shrine of Haji Malang Baba, there are a number of shopkeepers who persuade the pilgrims to wash their face, hands and feet at the water taps provided by the side of their shops. They also offer them place for taking rest and to keep their footwear. This service is offered free of charge expecting that the pilgrims would purchase offerings to the Baba from their shops.
The shrine of Haji Malang Baba is a beautiful domed structure. It has two ‘mazaars’ (tombs), one that of the Baba and the other of his disciple Ma Fatima. Pilgrims offer prayers and spread the floral as well as cloth ‘chaddhars’ on the ‘mazaars’ as offerings in gratitude to the Baba.

The Shrine of Haji Malang Baba

From the Dargah, a further trek of 45 minutes to on hour, takes the pilgrims to the tombs of ‘Panch Peer’, the disciples of Baba who came with him. Along this stretch, one can also visit the place known as ‘Ghodya ki taap’. It is believed that after a mighty jump the horses of Haji Malang Baba and his companions landed on the hill and from the foot-prints of the horses water began to flow which is still being used for drinking.
After the pilgrimage to the shrine of Haji Malang Baba, those with adventurous spirit and stamina can venture to climb the mountain further to the top that will take them to the citadel (Balekilla).
Reaching the pinnacle of the Malang Gad is a real challenge for the professional trekkers. However, for amateur trekkers reaching the pinnacle by a very narrow path should also be a thrilling experience. From the top of the mountain one can see Chanderi, Matheran range to the south, Kalyan city, Mahuli to the north and Mumbai to the west.

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